Event Logos Still Sub Par Jonathan Munk

Event Logos Still Sub Par—Jonathan Munk

Word Count:
338

Summary:
For every seminar, conference, and annual event held across the world, there is usually a wordy, poorly designed logo to accompany it. It seems that no matter how much the design community does to impress upon people the importance of a good logo design, it seems as though event planners must not hear it.

Keywords:
logo design logos maker graphic

Article Body:
For every seminar, conference, and annual event held across the world, there is usually a wordy, poorly designed logo to accompany it. It seems that no matter how much the design community does to impress upon people the importance of a good logo design, it seems as though event planners must not hear it.

Every day as I browse the logo news I find at least one article about a logo being launched for some type of event. When I see the design, I am almost always disappointed with the lack of creativity and general skill level. I’m sure that a logo is one of the last things on a person’s mind when they are trying to secure a venue, attract attendees, fill speaker openings, and make sure everything goes just right. But at the same time, having a killer logo for any event makes it more attractive to potential attendees. The event will have better attendance, build more trust, and perhaps most importantly, sell more promotional products.

This is especially important for large-scale, repeated events, such as the Olympics. Everyone recognizes the five interlocking ring design. But most host cities design a logo for their city that becomes the main logo used to promote the event.

Today one of three logos being used for the Beijing 2008 Olympics—known as the “Green Olympics” design—was unveiled, and is a big disappointment as well. I’m sure a lot of time and money were spent to come up with this design, but the logo seems very amateurish and lacks visual balance, in my opinion. I would never buy anything with that design on it. Hopefully the Olympic organizing committee will do a better job with the other two logos, which have yet to be revealed—the “People’s Olympics” and “Hi-tech Olympics,” or they may have a plethora of mugs and hats when the final anthem plays.

For anyone thinking about getting a logo designed for their event, read up on LogoWorks in the Wall Street Journal.


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